Ebola in the German media

Today I want to describe the impression of the Ebola emergency I had from the German media before coming to Sierra Leone and compare this impression with the real situation. I’m not claiming that I’m overseeing the whole media landscape in Germany, nor that I always interpreted the contents correctly. However, I’m consuming German media and that allows me to describe my authentic impression.

This impression was the following: Ebola is spreading in Sierra Leone more and more, because it is a very dangerous infectious disease and highly contagious. Despite enormous funding from abroad, the international community is unable to stop the epidemic. On top of that, the local population is a bit stupid and is not observing the behavioural rules necessary to curb the disease.

Example:

Titelseite Engl 1

Titelseite Engl 2

That reflects more or less what was being communicated from my point of view. The result was, that many of my friends and family considered my wish to get involved in the Ebola response as being risky and even reckless. My aunt wanted to tie me up in the cellar in order to prevent me from leaving, and a friend was insisting that I should not touch any objects in Sierra Leone, because the virus could contaminate anything. Some friends did not know before my departure in November, that Ebola can be transmitted only through body fluids and not through the air like, for example, the flue. After all this journalist work being published in newspapers, radio and TV I’m really wondering what went wrong. While reporting about a more or less unknown sickness, wouldn’t it be most important to try to explain the mode of infection first? Should media not try to communicate this first? Instead, fear was being created, discussions revolved around the question whether or not German citizens are in danger. From my perspective, the German media failed. And that is one of the reasons for this blog.

And just to let you know: To get infected with Ebola requires ignorance of basic hygiene practices and precautions. The government of Sierra Leone was not very strong before Ebola and the emergency state did not exactly improve their ability to perform. Public spending is marginal, especially in disaster prevention and awareness. Foreign funds are spend too much on treatment and research. Many people are illiterate, don’t have radios and are deeply rooted in their traditions. The dangerousness or difficult treatment are only one factor beyond other, more important ones.

This is a translation of my original article in German.

Julia Broska

Julia arbeitet für die Welthungerhilfe im Projektmanagement in Sierra Leone. Sie beschreibt in diesem Blog ihre persönlichen Eindrücke. Ihre Meinung muss sich nicht mit der der Welthungerhilfe decken. Bevor Julia nach Sierra Leone kam war sie in Nord Korea im Einsatz. Sie schreibt auch Artikel für den offiziellen Blog der Welthungerhilfe

More Posts - Website - Twitter

Ebola in den deutschen Medien

Heute möchte ich mal über meinen Eindruck schreiben, den die deutschen Medien bei mir hinterlassen hatten, und diesen Eindruck mit der Realität vor Ort vergleichen. Ich erhebe weder Anspruch darauf, dass ich die mediale Berichterstattung in ihrer Gänze erfasst hätte, noch, dass ich vermittelte Inhalte immer richtig interpretiert habe. Trotzdem stelle ich eben einen Medien-Konsumenten dar, und den Eindruck dieses einen Konsumenten möchte ich hier beschreiben.

Mein Eindruck in Deutschland war also folgender: Ebola breitet sich in Sierra Leone immer weiter aus, weil es so eine gefährliche Krankheit ist, die in höchstem Maße ansteckend ist. Trotz enormer Finanzmittel gelingt es der internationalen Gemeinschaft nicht, die Verbreitung einzudämmen. Außerdem sind die Menschen auch ein bisschen dumm und halten sich nicht an die notwendigen Regeln.

Zum Beispiel hier:

Titelseite Dt

Das war in etwas das, was meiner Meinung nach vermittelt wurde bisher. Die Wirkung davon war, dass nicht weniger meiner Freunde und Verwandten mein Vorhaben, nach Sierra Leone zu gehen, für leichtsinnig und verantwortungslos gehalten haben. Eine Tante hätte mich am liebsten im Keller festgebunden, während ein Freund darauf bestand, dass ich auch keine Gegenstände mehr anfassen könne, weil alles potentiell Virenträger sein könnte. Einige Freunde wusste bis zu meiner Abreise im November nicht, dass Ebola nur über Körperflüssigkeiten übertragen werden kann und nicht über die Luft wie z.B. Grippe. Bei all diesen Berichten in Zeitung, Radio und Fernsehen frage ich mich ernsthaft, was da eigentlich schon wieder schief gelaufen ist?! Wenn man über eine neue Krankheit berichtet, wäre es da nicht vor allem wichtig, die genauen Ansteckungsmechanismen zu vermitteln? Wäre das nicht das Erste, um das sich die Medien kümmern sollten? Stattdessen wurden mal wieder haltlose Ängste geschürt und die öffentliche Diskussion zirkelte hauptsächlich darum, ob sich die Menschen in Deutschland um ihre eigene Gesundheit fürchten müssen. Aus meiner Sicht ist das nicht weniger als mediales Versagen und ein Armutszeugnis (und ein Grund mehr für diesen Blog).

Und um den Kreis zu schließen, mein Eindruck vor Ort ist folgender: Um sich mit Ebola zu infizieren, muss man grundlegende Hygienemaßnahmen missachten. Die Regierung war schon vor Ebola schwach und die Notsituation hat ihre Handlungsfähigkeit nicht gerade verstärkt. Die öffentlichen Gelder fließen zu wenig in Prävention und Aufklärung, dafür zu viel in Behandlung und Forschung. Viele Menschen können nicht lesen, haben keine Radios und sind fest in ihren Traditionen verwurzelt. Das sind die Gründe für die Ausbreitung. Mit der Gefährlichkeit oder schwierigen Behandelbarkeit von Ebola hat die Epidemie nur wenig zu tun.

Julia Broska

Julia arbeitet für die Welthungerhilfe im Projektmanagement in Sierra Leone. Sie beschreibt in diesem Blog ihre persönlichen Eindrücke. Ihre Meinung muss sich nicht mit der der Welthungerhilfe decken. Bevor Julia nach Sierra Leone kam war sie in Nord Korea im Einsatz. Sie schreibt auch Artikel für den offiziellen Blog der Welthungerhilfe

More Posts - Website - Twitter

Ebola and Lassa fever

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is by far the biggest Ebola epidemic the world has seen so far. Many people wonder why the virus could spread so far here. The Ebola outbreaks in the past in countries like Uganda or Congo could be brought under control much earlier. I’m sure there are many different reasons for this. But one reason which is mentioned again and again, doesn’t seem to hold true: It is claimed that it is the first Ebola outbreak ever in West Africa.

It’s true, it is indeed the first Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea. But the border region between Liberia and Sierra Leone is famous for being the hotspot of another virus: Lassa.

Until very recently, I didn’t know anything about Lassa. Incidentally I came across the following paragraph in the book “Chasing the Devil”, written by Tim Butcher:

„Lassa is one of the world’s deadliest diseases and not one to take chances with. It is a viral haemorrhagic fever, similar to ebola, that inflicts a slow and painful death on its victims by destroying blood vessels and causing bodily extremities to swell with excess fluid, like balloons filling with water. In extreme cases blood can gush from nostrils, eye-sockets, ears, even fingernail beds, and victims often die from drowning as their lungs fill with liquid.

What makes lassa so dangerous is that all secreted fluids can carry the virus, so family members, nurses or doctors looking after a victim can easily become contaminated. Entire families can be wiped out and the fatality rate among health workers, especially in the undeveloped world, is often terribly high. When scientists handle the virus in research facilities in the developed world they apply the highest safety standards, known as Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4), wearing sealed suits inside special laboratories where the air is not just filtered but kept at a pressure lower than atmospheric pressure, so that if there is an accidental leak the air inside the chamber cannot readily leak out. If caught early enough – something that requires sophisticated clinical testing – lassa fever is treatable with antiviral drugs, but by the time it is identified in rural areas in Africa, for example, where testing is limited, it is often so advanced that treatment becomes a battle of fluid levels as medics try to stop the patient from bleeding out while at the same time stopping themselves from becoming infected. Kenema lies in the border area between Sierra Leone and Liberia, a region with the unfortunate distinction of being one of the world’s lassa hotspots. It is most commonly spread by infected rats, through urine trails which they have the unsavoury habit of dripping everywhere as they move.”

That sounds very familiar. In both cases, Lassa as well as Ebola, we are talking about a haemorrhagic fever, and both have to be treated with the same high level of security. By all means: Why was nobody in Sierra Leone prepared for Ebola? Knowledge as well as equipment for viral infections like this should have been in the country already!!! Especially considering measures like the Hyogo Framework for Action (2005-2015), which brought disaster preparedness high on the international agenda.

MSF (Medecins Sans Frontieres) published a report last week and was pointing on similar observations, thereby referring to the last big health crisis, the Cholera epidemic in Haiti:

“The Ebola outbreak has often been described as a perfect storm: a cross-border epidemic in countries with weak public health systems that had never seen Ebola before,” said MSF general director Christopher Stokes.

“Yet this is too convenient an explanation. For the Ebola outbreak to spiral this far out of control required many institutions to fail. And they did, with tragic and avoidable consequences.”

The lessons learned by the WHO from the last international pubic health crisis, the cholera outbreak in Haiti that began in 2010 – were simply ignored and not put in place, says the report.

It is useless to look for one guilty person or agency. But what was missed out after Cholera and Lassa should not be missed out again: To learn from mistakes.

This is a translation of my original article in German.

Julia Broska

Julia arbeitet für die Welthungerhilfe im Projektmanagement in Sierra Leone. Sie beschreibt in diesem Blog ihre persönlichen Eindrücke. Ihre Meinung muss sich nicht mit der der Welthungerhilfe decken. Bevor Julia nach Sierra Leone kam war sie in Nord Korea im Einsatz. Sie schreibt auch Artikel für den offiziellen Blog der Welthungerhilfe

More Posts - Website - Twitter

Ebola und Lassa Fieber

Der Ebola-Ausbruch in Westafrika ist mit Abstand der größte Ebola-Ausbruch, den die Welt je erlebt hat. Viele fragen sich, warum es ausgerechnet in Westafrika zu so einer enormen Verbreitung des Virus kommen konnte. Die Ausbrüche, die es in der Vergangenheit in Ländern wie Uganda oder dem Kongo gab, wurden viel eher unter Kontrolle gebracht. Es gibt sicherlich viele Gründe dafür. Aber einer, der immer wieder als Grund genannt wird, gehört nicht dazu, zumindest nicht wirklich: Es sei der erste Ebola-Ausbruch in Westafrika gewesen.

Es stimmt, Ebola gab es noch nie zuvor in Sierra Leone, Liberia oder Guniea. Aber wofür gerade die Grenzregion zwischen Liberia und Sierra Leone aber als Hotspot bekannt ist, ist ein anderes Virus: Lassa.

Über Lassa wusste ich bis vor kurzen eigentlich gar nichts. Aber zufällig bin ich in dem Buch „Chasing the Devil“ von Tim Butcher auf folgenden Absatz gestoßen:

„Lassa is one of the world’s deadliest diseases and not one to take chances with. It is a viral haemorrhagic fever, similar to ebola, that inflicts a slow and painful death on its victims by destroying blood vessels and causing bodily extremities to swell with excess fluid, like balloons filling with water. In extreme cases blood can gush from nostrils, eye-sockets, ears, even fingernail beds, and victims often die from drowning as their lungs fill with liquid.

What makes lassa so dangerous is that all secreted fluids can carry the virus, so family members, nurses or doctors looking after a victim can easily become contaminated. Entire families can be wiped out and the fatality rate among health workers, especially in the undeveloped world, is often terribly high. When scientists handle the virus in research facilities in the developed world they apply the highest safety standards, known as Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4), wearing sealed suits inside special laboratories where the air is not just filtered but kept at a pressure lower than atmospheric pressure, so that if there is an accidental leak the air inside the chamber cannot readily leak out. If caught early enough – something that requires sophisticated clinical testing – lassa fever is treatable with antiviral drugs, but by the time it is identified in rural areas in Africa, for example, where testing is limited, it is often so advanced that treatment becomes a battle of fluid levels as medics try to stop the patient from bleeding out while at the same time stopping themselves from becoming infected. Kenema lies in the border area between Sierra Leone and Liberia, a region with the unfortunate distinction of being one of the world’s lassa hotspots. It is most commonly spread by infected rats, through urine trails which they have the unsavoury habit of dripping everywhere as they move.”

Übersetzung:

“Lassa ist eine der tödlichsten Krankheiten der Welt, mit ihr ist nicht zu Spaßen. Es handelt sich um ein virales hämorrhagisches Fieber, genau wie Ebola, das einen langsamen und schmerzhaften Tod zur Folge hat, indem Blutgefäße zerstört werden und die Extremitäten mit Flüssigkeit anschwellen wie Ballons. In extremen Fällen kann Blut aus Nase, Augen, Ohren und sogar Fingernägel-Betten austreten und Opfer sterben häufig durch Ertrinken, weil sich ihre Lungen mit Flüssigkeit füllen.

Was Lassa so gefährlich macht ist, dass alle Körperflüssigkeiten den Virus tragen können. Familienmitglieder, Krankenschwestern oder Ärzte, die einen Patienten versorgen, können sich leicht selbst infizieren. Ganze Familien können ausgelöscht werden und die Todesrate unter Gesundheitsarbeitern, vor allem in Entwicklungsländern, ist schrecklich hoch. Wenn Wissenschaftler das Virus in Forschungseinrichtungen untersuchen, müssen die höchsten Sicherheitsstandards angewandt werden, sie müssen verschlossene Plastikanzüge in speziellen Labors tragen, in denen die Luft nicht einfach nur gefiltert wird, sondern sogar unter Unterdruck steht. Kommt es zu einem Unfall, kann die Luft aus dem Labor nicht einfach ausströmen. Wird Lassa früh genug erkannt – was fortschrittliche Testmethoden erfordert – kann es mit antiviralen Medikamenten behandelt werden. Aber zu dem Zeitpunkt, zu dem es im ländlichen Afrika erkannt wird, zum Beispiel in Regionen mit begrenzten Möglichkeiten für Labortests, ist es meist so Fortgeschritten, das die Behandlung zu einem Kampf von Flüssigkeitsständen wird: Die Ärzte versuchen, den Patienten vom Verbluten zu bewahren, während sie gleichzeitig versuchen, sich nicht selbst anzustecken. Kenema liegt in der Grenzregion von Sierra Leone zu Liberia, eine Region mit dem zweifelhaften Ruf, einer der Lassa-Hotspots der Welt zu sein. Lassa wird normalerweise durch infizierte Ratten verbreitet, durch Urinspuren die leider auf Schritt und Tritt von Ratten hinterlassen werden.“

Das kommt einem doch sehr bekannt vor. Es handelt sich also sowohl bei Lassa, als auch bei Ebola um ein hämorrhagisches Fieber, und beide müssen mit gleichen Sicherheitsstandards behandelt werden. Warum um alles in der Welt war man in Sierra Leone dann nicht besser vorbereitet gewesen? Es hätte dann doch eigentlich schon know-how als auch Equipment für genau solche Viruserkrankungen im Land sein müssen!!! Und das in einer Zeit, in der z.B. der Hyogo Framework for Action (2005-2015) die Welt zu einem Fokus auf Katastrophenvorsorge aufgerufen hat.

Ärzte ohne Grenzen hat vergangene Woche einen Report veröffentlicht und ähnliches angeprangert, allerdings in Bezugnahme auf die letzte große Epidemie, nämlich Cholera in Haiti:

“The Ebola outbreak has often been described as a perfect storm: a cross-border epidemic in countries with weak public health systems that had never seen Ebola before,” said MSF general director Christopher Stokes.

“Yet this is too convenient an explanation. For the Ebola outbreak to spiral this far out of control required many institutions to fail. And they did, with tragic and avoidable consequences.”

The lessons learned by the WHO from the last international pubic health crisis, the cholera outbreak in Haiti that began in 2010 – were simply ignored and not put in place, says the report.“

Übersetzung:

„Der Ebola-Ausbruch wurde häufig als der “perfekte Sturm” beschrieben: eine grenzüberschreitende Epidemie in Ländern mit schwacher Gesundheitsversorgung, die zudem noch nie zuvor mit Ebola zu tun hatten“, sagte der Generaldirektor von MSF Christopher Stokes.

„Aber das ist eine zu bequeme Erklärung. Dass ein Ebola-Ausbruch dermaßen außer Kontrolle gerät, erfordert das Versagen vieler Institutionen. Und genau das ist passiert, mit tragischen und vermeidbaren Konsequenzen.“

Die Lektionen, die die Weltgesundheitsorganisation von der letzten internationalen Gesundheitskrise – dem Cholera-Ausbruch in Haiti 2010 – gelernt hatte, wurden schlicht ignoriert und nicht angewandt, sagt der Report.“

Es ist müßig einen Schuldigen finden zu wollen. Aber was bei Cholera und Lassa offenbar versäumt wurde, sollte bei Ebola nicht wieder versäumt werden: Aus den Fehlern die gemacht wurden zu lernen.

Julia Broska

Julia arbeitet für die Welthungerhilfe im Projektmanagement in Sierra Leone. Sie beschreibt in diesem Blog ihre persönlichen Eindrücke. Ihre Meinung muss sich nicht mit der der Welthungerhilfe decken. Bevor Julia nach Sierra Leone kam war sie in Nord Korea im Einsatz. Sie schreibt auch Artikel für den offiziellen Blog der Welthungerhilfe

More Posts - Website - Twitter

Sex as crime? – Criminalization of Ebola Survivors

Ebola survivors have a problem: At least three months after they are released as being cured, semen and vaginal excretions can contain the Ebola virus. That turns them into a risk factor in the fight against Ebola. They can cause a new outbreak of the virus anytime, even though the fight might seem to be won already. The recent new case in Liberia, after 28 days without new cases, might have been caused by unprotected sex with a survivor. That might or might not be the case. The fact remains that survivors are a real “danger”.

However, from my perspective, the attitude of the Sierra Leonean governments is not leading into the right direction. Last week the front page of the daily newspaper Awareness Times carried the headline: “Ernest Bai Koroma Warns Survivors to Delay Having Sex”. This is a message from his Excellency the president himself. In the article they say that hard measures are to be expected in case a survivor is causing another case of Ebola. And as far as I know at least one person was sentenced to one year in prison already, because he infected a sex worker.

150327 SurvivorSex

From my personal point of view that’s the wrong approach. First, I think it’s unrealistic that survivors abstain from sex for three months. My impression is that at least 2 factors are being overlooked here: 1. The strong human tendency to neglect. Ebola was long considered to be just a rumour sewn by the government to weaken the opposition, and according to my national colleagues, HIV is also being neglected. 2. Sex seems to be considered as an essential “human right”. That is a dangerous combination in times of Ebola.

On top of this, I’m sure that no wife will blackmail her husband if he has to go for one year to jail afterwards! In case the infected person is a sex worker I can imagine that he or she will report to the police. But the own wife or husband will surely not want to lose her or his spouse, especially after just having recovered from a severe illness and potentially being a main contributor to the family’s income. Being punished for sex with the own spouse is just not implementable. How on earth does any lawyer proof that the infection happened during sexual intercourse when the couple concerned is denying it?!

I think it would be better to distribute condoms in high quantities AND to explain how to use them. Best in pictures. Such information material is readily available from HIV campaigns. Of course, the acceptance of condoms is in most African societies not high and Sierra Leone is by no means an exception. But the pressure from Ebola could even being considered as the optimal point in time to raise this acceptance. In any case I believe that the people have to be mobilized, affected people should act, take up responsibility themselves instead of being punished or rewarded from a “higher power”. It doesn’t make sense to put draconian measures in place. Instead, try to seek the consent and voluntarily compliance of the population. But would do I humble aid worker know about politics…

This is a translation of my original article in German.

Julia Broska

Julia arbeitet für die Welthungerhilfe im Projektmanagement in Sierra Leone. Sie beschreibt in diesem Blog ihre persönlichen Eindrücke. Ihre Meinung muss sich nicht mit der der Welthungerhilfe decken. Bevor Julia nach Sierra Leone kam war sie in Nord Korea im Einsatz. Sie schreibt auch Artikel für den offiziellen Blog der Welthungerhilfe

More Posts - Website - Twitter

Gefängnis für Sex? – Kriminalisierung von Ebola-Überlebenden

Ebola-Überlebende haben ein Problem: Noch mindestens drei Monate, nachdem sie als geheilt entlassen wurden, können in Spermien oder Vaginalflüssigkeiten Ebola-Viren enthalten sein. Damit werden sie zur Gefahr für den Erfolg im Kampf gegen Ebola und können jederzeit ein Wiederaufflackern der Epidemie verursachen, obwohl man das Virus schon für besiegt hielt. Es war in der Diskussion, ob der einzelne Fall, der in Liberia nach 28 Tagen ohne Fälle aufgetreten ist, durch Sex mit einem Überlebenden verursacht worden war. Es scheint aber, dass dies nun ausgeschlossen wurde. Wie dem auch immer sei, Überlebende stellen sozusagen eine reale Gefahr da.

Trotzdem ist aus meiner Sicht die Haltung der Regierung zu diesem Thema verfehlt. Auf der Titelseite der Tageszeitung Awareness Times war vergangene Woche zu lesen, dass „Überlebende gewarnt werden, auf Sex zu verzichten.“ Diese Botschaft kam vom Präsidenten höchst persönlich. Im Text hieß es dann, dass hart durchgegriffen werden, sollte bekannt werden, dass ein Überlebender einen neuen Ebola-Fall verursacht hat. Und soweit ich weiß wurde mind. 1 Person bereits zu einem Jahr Gefängnis verurteilt, da sie eine Sex-Arbeiterin infiziert hatte.

Ernest Bai Koroma warnt Überlebende vor frühzeitigem Sex.
Ernest Bai Koroma warnt Überlebende vor frühzeitigem Sex.

Aus meiner persönlichen Sicht ist das der falsche Ansatz. Zum einen halte ich es für unrealistisch, dass Überlebende drei Monate auf Sex verzichten. Mein Eindruck ist, dass mindestens zwei Dinge dem entgegenstehen: 1. Der Hang dazu, Gefahren zu verleugnen oder zu ignorieren. So wurde ja lange Ebola für ein Gerücht gehalten und was ich von meinen nationalen Kollegen so gehört habe, hält man auch HIV gerne für ganz weit weg vom eigenen Leben. 2. Sex wird hier, so mein Eindruck, als essentielles „Recht“ wahrgenommen. Ist ja in Deutschland nicht anders. Das ist eine gefährliche Kombination in Zeiten von Ebola.

Hinzu kommt, dass sicherlich keine Ehefrau ihren Mann „verpetzen“ wird, wenn er dafür 1 Jahr in den Knast wandern muss! Falls die Betroffene eine Sex-Arbeiterin ist, gut, dann kann ich mir das noch vorstellen. Aber die eigene Ehefrau hat sicherlich kein Interesse daran, ihren Mann, der gerade eine schwere Krankheit überlebt hat und potentiell wesentlich zum Einkommen der Familie beiträgt, ans Gefängnis zu verlieren oder z.B. auch eine Geldstrafe in Kauf zu nehmen. Soll heißen, Bestrafung für Sex halte ich für nicht praktikabel. Wie um alles in der Welt will man beweisen, dass ein Virus durch Sex übertragen wurde, wenn es die Betroffenen abstreiten?

Ich denke, es wäre sinnvoller, massenhaft Kondome zu verteilen UND zu erklären, wie man sie benutzen muss. Am besten in Bildern. Solches Informationsmaterial gibt es ja bereits zu hauf. Sicher, man kann jetzt einwenden, dass die Akzeptanz von Kondomen in den meisten afrikanischen Gesellschaften, so auch in Sierra Leone, ausgesprochen niedrig ist. Aber der Druck, der durch Ebola ausgeübt wird, wäre vielleicht sogar ein genialer Zeitpunkt, um eben diese Akzeptanz zu erhöhen. Denn einem Überlebenden sieht man natürlich nicht an, ob und wann er die Krankheit hatte. In jedem Fall denke ich, die Menschen müssen stärker mobilisiert werden, die Betroffenen als Handelnde, nicht als Opfer verstanden werden. Es ist aus meiner Sicht nicht sinnvoll, drastische Maßnahmen von oben zu verordnen. Stattdessen sollte die Zustimmung und aktive Unterstützung der Bevölkerung gewonnen werden. Aber was verstehe ich schon von Politik…

Julia Broska

Julia arbeitet für die Welthungerhilfe im Projektmanagement in Sierra Leone. Sie beschreibt in diesem Blog ihre persönlichen Eindrücke. Ihre Meinung muss sich nicht mit der der Welthungerhilfe decken. Bevor Julia nach Sierra Leone kam war sie in Nord Korea im Einsatz. Sie schreibt auch Artikel für den offiziellen Blog der Welthungerhilfe

More Posts - Website - Twitter

China’s humanitarian aid in the fight against Ebola

In the supermarket I recently came across two helpless Chinese. They wanted to buy cigarettes, but none of them spoke English. That made it difficult to negotiate prices. For me it was a highly welcome opportunity to use my – by now pretty rusty – Mandarin Chinese skills. The two were staff of the “Medical Aid Team of Chinese People’s Liberation Army to Sierra Leone”.

150123 Chinese Army

It was this encounter that made me curious and I tried to collect some information on China’s engagement in the fight against Ebola.

First, I found the following statistics (via VOX):

ebola funds

Regarding the pledged Ebola aid, China lies somewhere in the middle compared to other donor countries. Considering how many funds were disbursed in reality until end of December, China is falling back considerably. Nevertheless, new pledges of China make it onto the front pages of daily newspapers regularly.

150123 Chinese promises 1

150123 Chinese promises 2

The relationship between China and Sierra Leone seems to be not all-well. Sierra Leone belongs to the countries that were affected heavily from land grabbing in the past years. China’s development aid policy is frequently blamed for these processes.

On the other hand, newspapers display positive examples of China’s aid, for instance the support of an orphanage or the funding of awareness raising pages in the newspapers.

150123 Chinese Aid 1

150123 Chinese Aid 2

And the more than 100 million US dollar pledged by China is the highest amount of money ever pledged by the Chinese government for humanitarian aid abroad.

I personally want to point out that I meet very rarely Chinese representatives of aid organisations, donors or the government on meetings. Based on Sierra Leone’s history, the UK are heavily involved here in the aid operations, of course also the U.S. And the largest NGOs involved all have a European or North American back ground. That’s my personal observation. The position of the Chinese government towards development aid remains questionable, Ebola didn’t change this perception.

This is a translation of my original article in German.

Julia Broska

Julia arbeitet für die Welthungerhilfe im Projektmanagement in Sierra Leone. Sie beschreibt in diesem Blog ihre persönlichen Eindrücke. Ihre Meinung muss sich nicht mit der der Welthungerhilfe decken. Bevor Julia nach Sierra Leone kam war sie in Nord Korea im Einsatz. Sie schreibt auch Artikel für den offiziellen Blog der Welthungerhilfe

More Posts - Website - Twitter

Ebola and handicapped people

I personally never really thought of this topic and I don’t know much about assistance to handicapped people. Nevertheless I want to write about two interesting events I heard of recently.

On TV I saw a news clip about a local organization for the blind and visually impaired. They had issued an Ebola information leaflet in braille. Even though by now many comics and picture explanations are available to reach the illiterate, doesn’t mean that really everybody is reached. And the blind have a very real risk of contracting Ebola: Many depend on body contact to other people, for instance when they use the services of a personal assistant. This hold true generally for many people with handicaps: They might need assistance in everyday life, and this assistance includes frequently body contact, for example getting assistance with dressing, visiting the bathroom, eating etc. Handicapped people are clearly at risk.

Thomas Alieu, Executive Director of the Educational Centre for the Blind and Visually Impaired in Sierra Leone, says:

“The visually impaired people were feeling very vulnerable in the fight against Ebola, and there was a real sense of loneliness. This was primarily because in the Ebola outbreak, people are encouraged not to touch each other, but for the visually impaired, this makes it very difficult to go about in daily life.”

(Source: http://www.actionaid.org/india/shared/challenges-faced-visually-impaired-fighting-ebola-sierra-leone)

A local caring home for Polio victims send an email to me and asked if Welthungerhilfe would be able to distribute food to the inhabitants. Due to the Ebola crisis the number of staff was reduced to a very minimum and everybody tries to avoid any contact to the outside world in order to keep the inhabitants safe. Therefore it would be of great help if food would not have to be acquired on the market, where it is crowded and body contact can happen accidently.

For me it’s clear now that handicapped people might suffer from lack of access to information and that the sometimes impaired mobility is also creating many different problems. People with handicaps need special attention during project implementation, no matter if it’s an emergency like Ebola or long-term development projects. Everybody should have a chance to participate.

For more information:

http://www.handicap-international.us/ensuring

This article is a translation of the original German article.

Julia Broska

Julia arbeitet für die Welthungerhilfe im Projektmanagement in Sierra Leone. Sie beschreibt in diesem Blog ihre persönlichen Eindrücke. Ihre Meinung muss sich nicht mit der der Welthungerhilfe decken. Bevor Julia nach Sierra Leone kam war sie in Nord Korea im Einsatz. Sie schreibt auch Artikel für den offiziellen Blog der Welthungerhilfe

More Posts - Website - Twitter

Ebola und Menschen mit Behinderungen

Über dieses Thema hatte ich lange selbst nicht nachgedacht. Ich kenne mich auch nicht aus auf dem Gebiet der Betreuung von Menschen mit geistigen oder körperlichen Behinderungen. Trotzdem möchte ich von zwei interessanten Ereignissen berichten, über die ich zufällig gestolpert bin.

Im Fernsehen habe ich gesehen, dass eine lokale Vereinigung von Blinden und Sehbehinderten ein Informationsblatt zu Ebola in Blindenschrift herausgebracht hat. Denn auch wenn mittlerweile viele Informationen als gute Handzeichnungen zur Verfügung stehen, so dass auch Menschen erreicht werden, die nicht lesen können, hilft das Blinden natürlich herzlich wenig. Und die Ansteckungsgefahr ist für sie ja sehr real, denn sie sind oft auf Körperkontakt angewiesen, z.B. wenn sie einen Blindenführer in Anspruch nehmen. Dieses gilt generell für viele Menschen mit Behinderungen: Viele brauchen Assistenz um ihren Alltag zu bewältigen, und diese Assistenz umfasst oft auch Körperkontakt, z.B. Hilfe beim Anziehen, Toilettengang, Essen etc. Hier sind Menschen mit entsprechenden Behinderungen also klar gefährdet.

Thomas Alieu, Executive Director of the Educational Centre for the Blind and Visually Impaired in Sierra Leone, sagt:

„The visually impaired people were feeling very vulnerable in the fight against Ebola, and there was a real sense of loneliness. This was primarily because in the Ebola outbreak, people are encouraged not to touch each other, but for the visually impaired, this makes it very difficult to go about in daily life.“

Übersetzung: „Die Sehbehinderten haben sich im Kampf gegen Ebola sehr verletzlich und einsam gefühlt. Der Hauptgrund war, dass Menschen sich nicht berühren sollten während der Ebola-Krise, aber für Sehbehinderte ist das sehr schwierig im Alltag.“

(Quelle: http://www.actionaid.org/india/shared/challenges-faced-visually-impaired-fighting-ebola-sierra-leone)

Ein lokales Heim für Polio-Kranke hat mich angeschrieben und darum gebeten, dass die Welthungerhilfe das Heim mit Nahrung versorgt. Durch die Ebola-Krise sei das Hilfspersonal auf ein Minimum beschränkt worden und man versuche wo es ginge Kontakt zur Außenwelt zu vermeiden, um die Ansteckungsgefahr so gering wie möglich zu halten. Daher wäre es hilfreich, wenn auf den Einkauf auf dem Markt verzichtet werden könnte.

Für mich ist aber spätestens jetzt klar geworden, dass sich für Betroffene oft ganz andere Probleme stellen als für den Rest der Bevölkerung und dass vor allem die oft eingeschränkte Mobilität zahlreiche Probleme mit sich bringt. Menschen mit Behinderungen sollten auf jeden Fall besondere Aufmerksamkeit erfahren bei der Implementierung von Projekten, sei es nun Nothilfe wie im Fall von Ebola, oder seien es langfristige Entwicklungsprojekte. Jeder sollte teilhaben können.

Für mehr Infos empfehle ich diese Website:
http://www.handicap-international.us/ensuring

Julia Broska

Julia arbeitet für die Welthungerhilfe im Projektmanagement in Sierra Leone. Sie beschreibt in diesem Blog ihre persönlichen Eindrücke. Ihre Meinung muss sich nicht mit der der Welthungerhilfe decken. Bevor Julia nach Sierra Leone kam war sie in Nord Korea im Einsatz. Sie schreibt auch Artikel für den offiziellen Blog der Welthungerhilfe

More Posts - Website - Twitter

3 days lockdown in Freetown

Within the framework of the “Zero Ebola Campaign” the sierra-leonean government, or rather the “NERC” (National Ebola Response Committee), announced a three days lockdown. During the lockdown it is foreseen to do house-to-house checks for sick people who will then immediately be transferred to a treatment centre. The objective is to identify ALL sick people countrywide and to finally get to 0 new cases. The campaign will run for several weeks. It was announced already that in April more locked down weekends are planned.
What does that mean to me as a humanitarian aid worker? Of course, UN, government and NGOs enjoy exceptions. It was announced that a special passport will be necessary for free movement during the lockdown and this passport I received from my employer. Nevertheless, such a lockdown requires certain ahead-planning. Storing enough food for three days in the tropics without electricity? Not easy, if you want to eat something else than cookies. Here a picture of my groceries:

In the WHH Ebola Response WhatsApp Group interesting advice was circulated, for instance this nice compilation here:

Friday, day 1: I regarded this day as a normal working day and went to the office early in the morning. I’ve never before travelled so quickly from my house to the office, I think it took me less than 10 min, compared to usually 25 min. The traffic in Freetown is a nightmare, especially at roundabouts, and you waste a lot of time in the traffic usually. In the office it was nice and quiet, because most colleagues stayed at home. It was perfect to work through long pending documents. It was nice, indeed!

Saturday and Sunday, day 2 and 3: I stayed at home as required by a lockdown. It was a good opportunity to observe how the local people pass their time during a lockdown. Children were playing ball games in hidden corners. Teenager were sitting on the stairs in front of their houses to have a chat. One woman put a chair in front of her door and braided the hair of almost the whole of the female neighbourhood.

All in all the lockdown was a positive experience from my perspective. I had a quiet working space and a weekend at home is not bad to calm down from the busy day-to-day life. Whether the lockdown contributed positively to the fight against Ebola, I do not know.

This article is a translation of the original German Article by Julia

Julia Broska

Julia arbeitet für die Welthungerhilfe im Projektmanagement in Sierra Leone. Sie beschreibt in diesem Blog ihre persönlichen Eindrücke. Ihre Meinung muss sich nicht mit der der Welthungerhilfe decken. Bevor Julia nach Sierra Leone kam war sie in Nord Korea im Einsatz. Sie schreibt auch Artikel für den offiziellen Blog der Welthungerhilfe

More Posts - Website - Twitter